Teaching History

john-quincy-adams-pictureI loved teaching History!  No surprise there, considering the subtitle of this blog.  More than four decades in the classroom imbued me with definite ideas of how to go about the important task of conveying the story of the human past and its legacies to students, ideas I gladly share, because, after all, I’m “not shy.”

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  1. Two Books I Wish I’d Read When I was Teaching Civil Rights–September 20, 2010.
  2. Growing Up with Vietnam, I–December 17, 2010.
  3. Growing Up with Vietnam, II–January 8, 2011.
  4. Growing Up with Vietnam, III–February 1, 2011.
  5. Growing Up with Vietnam, IV–March 1, 2011.
  6. “Springtime and Vietnam”–April 1, 2011.
  7. Editorial, “On Dixie Station”–May 2, 2011.
  8. It’s Navel-Gazing Time for Historians (Again)–July 1, 2011.
  9. A Love of History:  Nature or Nurture?  Yes!!–July 16, 2011.
  10. Past Personal: Teaching the Vietnam War as History–May 1, 2012.
  11. Reading the Civil War: “Patriotic Gore”–And More–June 16, 2012.
  12. The Uses of History in Tom Stoppard’s “Arcadia”–August 1, 2012.
  13. High School, Now–and Then–September 1, 2012.
  14. Echoes of the Scopes Trial, 1925-2000–October 1, 2012.
  15. Race–and History–Matter–April 1, 2013.
  16. Teaching History “Backwards”–October 15, 2013.
  17. The Lecture-Discussion Conundrum–December 16, 2013.
  18. Reflecting in History’s Mirror–January 7, 2014.
  19. The Little Course That Did–February 14, 2014.
  20. Growing Up in Colonial New England–June 15, 2014.
  21. The South on the Nation’s Psychiatric Couch, Again–July 12, 2014.
  22. American Witch-Hunters: Salem & McCarthy–August 15, 2014.
  23. The Changing Face of the South–December 15, 2014.
  24. American Republicanism, Part I–April 1, 2015.
  25. “New South”?  What “New South”?–January 15, 2015.
  26. Life in the Segregated South–March 2, 2015.
  27. Read One for the Gipper–March 16, 2015.
  28. “Nixonland” or “The Age of Reagan?–April 15, 2015.
  29. American Republicanism Part II–May 1, 2015.
  30. American Republicanism, Part III–June 1, 2015.
  31. American Republicanism, Part IV–July 15, 2015.
  32. In [Digital] Pursuit of Dead Georgians–August 15, 2015.
  33. The “Great Migration”: Two Views–January 1, 2016.
  34. Historical Problem, 1–January 15, 2016.
  35. Historical Problem, 2–February 15, 2016.
  36. Growing Up White in the Jim Crow South–March 1, 2016.
  37. Historical Problem, 3–March 15, 2016.
  38. Historical Problem, 4–April 15, 2016.
  39. Changing Views of the Removal of the Cherokees from Georgia–May 1, 2016.
  40. Historical Problem, 5–May 15, 2016.
  41. Historical Problem, 6–June 15, 2016.
  42. Historical Problem, 7–July 15, 2016.
  43. Historical Problem, 8–August 15, 2016.
  44. Teaching 21st-Century Students–September 1, 2016.
  45. Teaching in a Prep School with a PhD, 1–November 6, 2012.
  46. Teaching in a Prep School with a PhD, 2–December 1, 2013.
  47. Teaching in a Prep School with a PhD, 3–October 16, 2016.
  48. The Long Arm of Jim Crow Justice–November 1, 2016.
  49. “Massive Resistance” at Ground Level–December 1, 2016.
  50. Anatomy of a Lynching–April 1, 2017.
  51. A Doomed Fight for Justice in the Jim Crow South–February 1, 2017.
  52. Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Hillbillies–August 1, 2017.

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For  those interested in reading more of my reflections on history, here are links to several books on the subject:

REABP CoverRancorous Enmities and Blind Partialities:  Parties and Factions in Georgia, 1807-1845 (University Press of America, 2015)

Pursuit Cover

In Pursuit of Dead Georgians:  One Historian’s Excursions into the History of His Adopted State (iUniverse, 2015)

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Politics on the Periphery:  Factions and Parties in Georgia, 1783-1806 (University of Delaware Press, 1986)