The South/Civil Rights

 john-quincy-adams-pictureI became a historian of the American South by virtue of my graduate training and a student of the Civil Rights Movement out of conviction, because gripping images of the Movement had been such a constant presence on television when I was growing up in the 1950s.  The posts listed below trace that journey.

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  1. Two books I Wish I Had Read While Still Teaching Civil Rights–September 20, 2010.
  2. Civil Rights–and Wrongs–January 1, 2012.
  3. Race–and History–Matter–April 1, 2013.
  4. Teaching History Backwards–October 15, 2013.
  5. The Changing Face of the South–December 15, 2014.
  6. The South on the Nation’s Psychiatric Couch, Again–July 12, 2014.
  7. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and His Legacy–January 1, 2015.
  8. “New South”?  What “New South”?–January 15, 2015.
  9. Life in the Segregated South–March 2, 2015.
  10. The Great Migration–January 1, 2016.
  11. A Post for Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, 2016–January 16, 2016.
  12. Growing Up White in the Jim Crow South–March 1, 2016.
  13. The Long Arm of Jim Crow Justice–November 1, 2016.
  14. “Massive Resistance” at Ground Level–December 1, 2016.
  15. A Post for Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, 2017–January 3, 2017.
  16. Anatomy of a Lynching–April 1, 2017.
  17. A Doomed Fight for Justice in the Jim Crow South–February 1, 2017.

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For  those interested in reading more of my reflections on history, here are links to several books on the subject:

REABP CoverRancorous Enmities and Blind Partialities:  Parties and Factions in Georgia, 1807-1845 (University Press of America, 2015)

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In Pursuit of Dead Georgians:  One Historian’s Excursions into the History of His Adopted State (iUniverse, 2015)

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Politics on the Periphery:  Factions and Parties in Georgia, 1783-1806 (University of Delaware Press, 1986)